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Award Winners in the
ASAA 2010 Aerospace Art Exhibition
San Diego Air and Space Museum
June 6, 2010 – September 10, 2010

To see all the art in the ASAA Exhibit click here

Founders Awards
Attendees Unjuried Exhibit

Blue
Pete Wenman
Phantom Study

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Blue
Crissie Murphy
Paratrooper

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Silver
Steve Heyen
SE-5A’s at Dawn

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Silver
Mark Bray
Yes is does come in a bottle

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Gold
Werner Heuptli
No Hiding in the Sky any longer

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Walter Jefferies Awards
Attendees Unjuried Exhibit

Mark Bray
Yes it does come in a bottle

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Attendees Work done on site – Tie !

Merana Cadorette
Red Stearman

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Vincent Meslet
Ryan STA

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Women in Aviation Award

Mark Bray
The Magic of Flight

28 x 22
Watercolor

The fascination with flight has been around as long as mankind is old. As adults, we can understand how birds fly, how airplanes get off the ground and how the Space Shuttle leaves the grip of Earth and heads into space. “The Magic of Flight” is all about that inherent need to look into the sky and wonder at anything and everything that moves within it, just as a child does.


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Nixon Galloway Award

Pati O’Neal
Rise and Shine Cubs

24 x 30
Oil

This painting captures the beginning of a brand new day for these Piper J3 Cubs as the hangar door opens to let the rays of the rising sun in.

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Windsor Newton Award

Brian Bateman
To Fight Another Day

30 x 46
Oil

The subject is a B-29 Super fortress that has ditched in the Pacific in December 1944. The 11 man crew of “V Squared 60” reached safety in their rafts before the giant bomber sank into the sea. The crew was fighting not only to survive the ditching but the vast ocean and the fast approaching dusk. Ships, submarines, and search planes (Catalinas, Dumbos) were placed along the routes of the bombers in order to give the crews at least a 50/50 chance of survival. Via radio and some lady luck, this crew has made contact with one of those PBYs along the route. They were lucky to survive the ditching in a rough sea and lucky to fight another day.

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Duane Whitney Martin Award

Joe Kline
Good Vibrations

24 x 36
Oil

The area of Northern I Corps in South Vietnam was mostly mountainous with very few roads. During the Vietnam War, the U.S. Army established artillery fire bases with overlapping fields of fire and hilltop landing zones were established to insert and re-supply ground troops. In this scene, repeated thousands of times during the war, a UH-1 Huey “Slick” pulls away from a hilltop LZ as others approach to land.

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Boeing Spirit of Flight Award

Stan Vosburg
Twin Tails and Carrot Tops

30X42
Oil

Two "Rosy Riveters" from the ball turret factory in Anaheim, California, have traveled to Corona del Mar for a brief respite from their grueling work schedule and to let their children play in the shallows at low tide. Military airplanes flying overhead were a common sight, but it was always exciting to see the P-38s of the Home Defense group up close and low. The finishing touch to a sand castle is a worthy work of art, but for one of the redheaded twins the approach and roar of two supercharged Allison engines is enough to send him leaping in ecstasy.

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AVWeek Awards

General Aviation - First Place
Ross Buckland
Canadian Classics

34X46
Oil

Depicted are two of Canada's proudest transportation achievements, the Noorduyn Norseman and Canadian Pacific's Selkirks. The Selkirks, constructed in Montreal from 1929 until 1949, were the largest steam locomotives in the Commonwealth. Thirty-six were built to haul the freight and passenger trains through the Rockies between Calgary and Revelstoke. On a daily basis, they crossed the Selkirk Range after which they were named.

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General Aviation - Second Place
Pati O’Neal
Staggerwing Reflections

24X30
Oil

This painting captures the reflections in the immaculate finish of a classic 1944 Beechcraft Model D17S Staggerwing set off by the setting sun.

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General Aviation - Third Place

Cher Pruys
A Canadian Moment

17 x 21
Watercolor

This trusty Cessna 185 aircraft portrayed at the dock in the mist is truly a Northern Canadian scene.

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AVWeek Awards

Space - First Place

Larry Manofsky
One-Hundred Ninety-Million Horsepower

52 x 40
Acrylic

The first stage of the Saturn V rocket was powered by five F-1 engines manufactured by Rocketdyne of Canoga Park, CA. This type of engine was first test fired in March 1959 and is still the largest single-chamber rocket engine ever built. Each engine consumed 680 gallons of kerosene and liquid oxygen per second and produced 1.5 million pounds of thrust. The five engines of the Saturn V were capable of accelerating the 7.5 million pound, 363-foot tall moon rocket to a speed of 6,200 miles per hour, 9 times faster than a speeding bullet.

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Space - Second Place

John Clark
The Occultation of Saturn

12 x 16
Oil

The planet Saturn begins its passage behind one of its moons.

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Space - Third Place

Keith Ferris
John Glenn and Friendship 7

24 x 30
Oil

John Glenn and Friendship 7

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AVWeek Awards

Military - First Place

Joe Kline
God’s own Lunatics

24 x 26
Oil

The title was endearingly bestowed upon Vietnam War helicopter crews by war correspondent and journalist Joe Galloway. The UH-1 Huey “Slick” was by far the most widely used helicopter of the war and over 2,500 were lost during that conflict. In this scene, a Huey “Slick” lands amidst withering fire to pick up a LRRP (Long Range Reconnaissance Patrol). One tenth of all soldier lost during the Viet Nam War were helicopter crewmen.

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Military - Second Place

Steve Heyen
The Nine O Nine

29 x 45
Oil

B-17 G-30-BO of the 333rd Bomb Squadron, 91st Bomb Group, encounters home defense Me109s over Germany in 1944.

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Military - Third Place

Douglas Castleman
North American F-100D

12 x 28
Oil

North American F-100D Super Sabre of the 353rd TFS, 354th TFW, Myrtle Beach AFB, South Carolina, 1959.

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AVWeek Awards

Commercial - First Place

Steve Remington
Shared Airspace— Oyster Bay — 1934 Bellanca Airbus P-200A

24 x 36
Alkyd

Arguably the most efficient airplane design ever built, the Bellanca “Airbus” P-200A floatplane NC-785W was used as an aerial commuter from the wealthy enclaves of Long Island to Wall Street’s East River float, commencing July 16, 1934 as New York-Suburban Air Lines. Airline use ceased that year as regulations prohibited single engine transports. Only four of the civilian Airbus examples were built and about 14 more were delivered to the A.C.C. as the C-27-A to -C. The later “Aircruiser” model, with more muscle, was extensively used in Canada as a bush airplane.

The White Pelican can be found in eastern bays and estuaries during the summer month’s breeding season.



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Commercial - Second Place

Tom Kalina
Mainliner Chicago

28 x 40
Oil

A United Airlines Douglas DC-6B "Mainliner Chicago" arrives in the evening at Chicago's Midway Airport in the mid-fifties.

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Commercial - Third Place

David Rawlins
N44V

30 x 49
Acrylic/Oil

Piedmont Airlines was based in Winston-Salem NC and flew their first scheduled flight in February 1948 using a DC-3. Piedmont operated 22 DC-3s, retiring the last of them in 1963.

In 1986, Piedmont purchased a former C-47, built in 1942, which had been converted to DC-3 configuration after the war and used as an executive transport. Piedmont had it painted in the old Piedmont colors and re-registered as N44V and used it for promotional purposes. Piedmont Airlines was absorbed into US Air in 1989.
N44V is currently owned and operated by the Carolinas Aviation Museum based at the Charlotte-Douglas airport in Charlotte NC.

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Best of the Best

Russell Smith
By The Dawn’s Early Light

24 x 46
Oil

Three Nieuport 17s of the Lafayette Escadrille, piloted by Lts. Lufebery, Thaw and Hill, fly a morning patrol over the Western Front in 1916.

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ASAA Awards

Honorable Mentions

Mark Jannokos
Rockets

32 x 54
Oil

Rockets

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William A. Dodge
Home Again, Home Again, Jiggety Jig

46 x 36
Oil

Spitfire Mark IIs of the No. 501 Squadron join up over the English countryside and return home after an encounter in June 1941.

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Paul Rendel
Clear Guns

29 x 41
Oil

A new day and one more long mission with B-17's settling into the formation. The Ball turret gunner is ready for the order to be given: "Clear Guns."
Program for American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA).

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Larry Manofsky
One-Hundred Ninety-Million Horsepower

52 x 40
Acrylic

The first stage of the Saturn V rocket was powered by five F-1 engines manufactured by Rocketdyne of Canoga Park, CA. This type of engine was first test fired in March 1959 and is still the largest single-chamber rocket engine ever built. Each engine consumed 680 gallons of kerosene and liquid oxygen per second and produced 1.5 million pounds of thrust. The five engines of the Saturn V were capable of accelerating the 7.5 million pound, 363-foot tall moon rocket to a speed of 6,200 miles per hour, 9 times faster than a speeding bullet.

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Gretchen Taylor
Uh Oh!

47 x 41
Oil

Sleek in design and all business, one would not want to be on the receiving end of this A129 Augusta Mangusta.

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Sharon Rajnus
Ultimate Recycle

46 x 36
Oil

In the West, fighting fires is real, frequent, and deadly. Recycled aircraft, military and commercial, are regularly refitted with tanks to handle retardant making them the ultimate recycled airplanes. Here you see a PB-4Y Privateer dumping over a fast-moving front.

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Steve Heyen
The Nine-O-Nine

29 x 45
Oil

B-17 G-30-BO of the 333rd Bomb Squadron, 91st Bomb Group, encounters home defense Me109s over Germany in 1944.

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John Clark
Mariner 10 Above Venus

30 x 40
Oil

Mariner 10 was launched on November 2, 1973 atop the Atlas/Centaur rocket from Launch Complex 36B. The spacecraft was placed in a parking orbit after launch for approximately 25 minutes, and then placed in orbit around the Sun en route to Venus. The orbit direction was opposite to the motion of the Earth around the Sun. The spacecraft passed Venus on February 5, 1974 at a distance of 4200 km and took some 4,000 photos of Venus. They revealed a nearly round planet enveloped in smooth cloud layers.

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ASAA Merit Awards - $500 and plaque

Tom Kalina
Mainliner Chicago

28 x 40
Oil

A United Airlines Douglas DC-6B "Mainliner Chicago" arrives in the evening at Chicago's Midway Airport in the mid-fifties.

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ASAA Merit Awards - $500 and plaque

Charles Thompson
The Bateleur Eagle

24 x 21
Oil

Cessna-Rheims F337 LYNX of 4 Squadron, the Rhodesian Air Force.

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Award of Distinction - $1,000 and plaque

Steve Anderson
On the Way to China

32 x 44
Oil

Colonel Bill Bower, now 94, is one of the last surviving pilots of the 1942 Doolittle raid on Japan. The B-25 serial # 40-2278 was named "Fickle Finger" and was the twelfth plane of sixteen in the staggered row packed on the deck of USS Hornet. Names weren’t painted on most of the planes due to the nature of the mission. According to Bower's mission report, after hitting their targets at Yokohama, they strafed with .30 and .50 cal incendiary rounds, a Japanese weather boat and left it burning and sinking.

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James V. Roy Award $1500 and plaque

Russell Smith
Starting Line

26 x 56
Oil

“Starting Line” features Eddie Rickenbacker and his famous SPAD XIII, S’4523, at the airfield of Saints, France, circa August 1918. Most depictions of S’4523 show it in its late configuration – shortened exhaust stacks, red/white/blue (back to front) rudder, and patched bullet holes. However, in August 1918, when the 94th Aero Squadron was based at Saints, S’4523 carried the standard length exhaust, no bullet patches and the original blue/white/red French rudder. The title is a dual reference to the action on the flight line and Rickenbacker’s pre-war career as a race car driver.

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